Monica Lo, MD

Cardiologist, Cardiac Electrophysiologist, Arkansas Heart Hospital

HOME: Port Lavaca, Texas; moved to Arkansas in July 2013

Monica Lo considers herself an “electrician of the heart,” and she’s in rare company. Fewer than 10 percent of board-certified cardiologists are also electrophysiologists, as she is, and fewer than 10 percent of all electrophysiologists are women. She ventured from the Lonestar State to the Natural State almost 10 years ago, and the hearts of Arkansas are in some of the most capable hands around with her.

Monica Lo, MD

Cardiologist, Cardiac Electrophysiologist, Arkansas Heart Hospital

HOME: Port Lavaca, Texas; moved to Arkansas in July 2013

Monica Lo considers herself an “electrician of the heart,” and she’s in rare company. Fewer than 10 percent of board-certified cardiologists are also electrophysiologists, as she is, and fewer than 10 percent of all electrophysiologists are women. She ventured from the Lonestar State to the Natural State almost 10 years ago, and the hearts of Arkansas are in some of the most capable hands around with her.

FIRST BIG BREAK:

I am not sure that there’s one specific incident/moment. I moved to Little Rock to establish a complex cardiac electrophysiology ablation program at Arkansas Heart Hospital. The program grew quickly, and we became one of the top centers in the country for these procedures, in terms of efficiency, efficacy and great outcomes. We participate in clinical trials and bring new technology to Arkansans. Now, I give lectures globally, and people travel to Little Rock from all over the country (and even from Japan) to observe different aspects of what we do.

ATTRACTION TO CAREER:

In medical school, often the career choice is either a surgical subspecialty or a non-surgical field. You’re either a “doer” or a “thinker.” Cardiology allows you to do procedures and fix problems structurally, but also to maintain a longitudinal relationship with patients.

BEST PART OF YOUR DAY:

Early mornings when everyone is still asleep. This is my “me” time when I read the Bible, exercise, plan my day and/or catch up on social media.

PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT:

To live the American Dream. I immigrated to the United States when I was 12 years old. I had a wonderful childhood in Taiwan, but career options there were made based on one entrance exam. When I moved, I did not know any English. I had to adapt quickly, learn English, and was able to make straight as during the first six-weeks of school and maintained it through middle school and high school.

LESSONS LEARNED DURING THE PANDEMIC:

Life is short, and we don’t have the ultimate control. It’s humbling not to be able to predict which patients will have mild symptoms, who will be long-haulers, who will end up losing their lives. Also, the social media algorithm is powerful. I think it really has divided our country more as a result.

FIRST BIG BREAK:

I am not sure that there’s one specific incident/moment. I moved to Little Rock to establish a complex cardiac electrophysiology ablation program at Arkansas Heart Hospital. The program grew quickly, and we became one of the top centers in the country for these procedures, in terms of efficiency, efficacy and great outcomes. We participate in clinical trials and bring new technology to Arkansans. Now, I give lectures globally, and people travel to Little Rock from all over the country (and even from Japan) to observe different aspects of what we do.

ATTRACTION TO CAREER:

In medical school, often the career choice is either a surgical subspecialty or a non-surgical field. You’re either a “doer” or a “thinker.” Cardiology allows you to do procedures and fix problems structurally, but also to maintain a longitudinal relationship with patients.

BEST PART OF YOUR DAY:

Early mornings when everyone is still asleep. This is my “me” time when I read the Bible, exercise, plan my day and/or catch up on social media.

PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT:

To live the American Dream. I immigrated to the United States when I was 12 years old. I had a wonderful childhood in Taiwan, but career options there were made based on one entrance exam. When I moved, I did not know any English. I had to adapt quickly, learn English, and was able to make straight as during the first six-weeks of school and maintained it through middle school and high school.

LESSONS LEARNED DURING THE PANDEMIC:

Life is short, and we don’t have the ultimate control. It’s humbling not to be able to predict which patients will have mild symptoms, who will be long-haulers, who will end up losing their lives. Also, the social media algorithm is powerful. I think it really has divided our country more as a result.

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